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Marian

Lista cu motoarele VAG din 1980 pana astazi

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Osi
Multumesc pentru aprecieri .

Lista va fi updatata si va contine toate modele fabricate de Vw din 1980 pana azi , insa e o munca titanica de documentare si va mai dura ceva vreme pana o sa termin documentul . :vaidecapulmeu:

Doar din '80 incoace? Si restul? :)

Primele sunt astea http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_air_cooled_engine

Oricum, felicitari pentru lista si ...spor la treaba!

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LeonetVW

hai noroc! ma baieti...eu am o mica problema cu motorul, :offtopic: ceea ce m-a facut sa scormonesc internetul si sa gugalesc la infinit. rezultatul e urmatorul:

http://www.sun-diagnostics.com/intl/en/pdf/html/full_vw.html

sper ca sa va fie de folos, mai ales ca pare destul de complet! :angry:

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razdan

Da, pare complet dar numai pana in 2002.

Pentru masinile din ultimii sase ani (si s-au schimbat cam toate generatiile) nu exista date pe sun-diagnostics.com. :vaidecapulmeu:

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LeonetVW

da, am observat si eu lucrul asta..pana in 2002...sper s aii ajute macar pe cei cu masini pana in 2002, ca mine..mi-a fost foarte de folos! poate am sa gasesc ceva si pt cele mai noi...

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tedy
Multumim pt lista, dar nu este completa...lipseste de ex. motorul de 1.8T cod ARX :icon_thumright:

pentru ceva mai detaliat http://www.bitnet.ro/vw/index.php daca va intereseaza

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barladi

Cu toate ca este foarte vechi topicul, o sa postez si eu. Lipseste codul BAM. Daca un moderator considera ca nu avea rost sa reinvii topicul, il rog sa stearga postul :)

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passat19tdi
Iata lista cu toate motoarele ( si principalele lor caracteristici ) existente pe modelele Vag :

Engine_list.doc

Enjoy boys ! :))

Ce reprezinta RON si CN din caracteristicile motoarelor ?....pozitia 15 din tabele

apropos nici AFN-ul meu nu este

Edited by passat19tdi

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Marian

La benzina RON = research octane number

The octane rating is a measure of the autoignition resistance of gasoline and other fuels used in spark-ignition internal combustion engines. It is a measure of anti-detonation of a gasoline or fuel.

Octane number is the number which gives the percentage, by volume, of iso-octane in a mixture of iso-octane and normal heptane, that would have the same anti-knocking capacity as the fuel which is under consideration. For example, gasoline with the same knocking characteristics as a mixture of 90% iso-octane and 10% heptane would have an octane rating of 90. [1]

Definition of octane rating

The octane rating of a spark ignition engine fuel is the knock resistance (anti-knock rating) compared to a mixture of iso-octane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane, an isomer of octane) and n-heptane. By definition, iso-octane is assigned an octane rating of 100 and heptane is assigned an octane rating of zero. An 87-octane gasoline, for example, possesses the same anti-knock rating of a mixture of 87% (by volume) iso-octane and 13% (by volume) n-heptane. This does not mean, however, that the gasoline actually contains these hydrocarbons in these proportions. It simply means that it has the same autoignition resistance as the described mixture.

A high tendency to autoignite, or low octane rating, is undesirable in a spark ignition engine but desirable in a diesel engine. The standard for the combustion quality of diesel fuel is the cetane number. A diesel fuel with a high cetane number has a high tendency to autoignite, as is preferred.

It should be noted that octane rating does not relate to the energy content of the fuel (see heating value), nor the speed at which the flame initiated by the spark plug propagates across the cylinder. It is only a measure of the fuel's resistance to autoignition. It is for this reason that one highly branched form, or isomer, of octane (2,2,4-trimethylpentane) has (by definition) an octane rating of 100, whereas n-octane (see octane), which has a linear arrangement of the 8 carbon atoms, has an octane rating of -10, even though the two fuels have exactly the same chemical formula and virtually identical heating values and flame speeds.

Measurement methods

The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON). RON is determined by running the fuel in a test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing these results with those for mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane.

There is another type of octane rating, called Motor Octane Number (MON) or the aviation lean octane rating, which is a better measure of how the fuel behaves when under load. MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, a higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON. Normally fuel specifications require both a minimum RON and a minimum MON.

In most countries (including all of Europe and Australia) the "headline" octane that would be shown on the pump is the RON, but in the United States, Canada and some other countries the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, sometimes called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), Road Octane Number (RdON), Pump Octane Number (PON), or (R+M)/2. Because of the 8 to 10 point difference noted above, this means that the octane in the United States will be about 4 to 5 points lower than the same fuel elsewhere: 87 octane fuel, the "regular" gasoline in the US and Canada, would be 91-92 in Europe. However most European pumps deliver 95 (RON) as "regular", equivalent to 90-91 US (R+M)/2, and even deliver 98 (RON) or 100 (RON).

The octane rating may also be a "trade name", with the actual figure being higher than the nominal rating.

It is possible for a fuel to have a RON greater than 100, because iso-octane is not the most knock-resistant substance available. Racing fuels, straight ethanol, AvGas and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) typically have octane ratings of 110 or significantly higher - ethanol's RON is 129 (MON 102, AKI 116) reference[1]. Typical "octane booster" additives include tetra-ethyl lead, MTBE and toluene. Tetra-ethyl lead is easily decomposed to its component radicals, which react with the radicals from the fuel and oxygen that would start the combustion, thereby delaying ignition. This is why leaded gasoline has a higher octane rating than unleaded.

La diesel CN = cetane number

Cetane number

Cetane number or CN is a measurement of the combustion quality of diesel fuel during compression ignition. It is a significant expression of diesel fuel quality among a number of other measurements that determine overall diesel fuel quality. Cetane number of a fuel is defined as the percentage by volume of normal cetane in a mixture of normal cetane and alpha-methyl naphthalene which has the same ignition characteristics (ignition delay) as the test fuel when combustion is carried out in a standard engine under specified operating conditions..

Cetane number is actually a measure of a fuel's ignition delay; the time period between the start of injection and start of combustion (ignition) of the fuel. In a particular diesel engine, higher cetane fuels will have shorter ignition delay periods than lower cetane fuels. Cetane numbers are only used for the relatively light distillate diesel oils. For heavy (residual) fuel oil two other scales are used CCAI and CII.

Generally, diesel engines run well with a CN from 40 to 55. Fuels with higher cetane number which have shorter ignition delays provide more time for the fuel combustion process to be completed. Hence, higher speed diesels operate more effectively with higher cetane number fuels. There is no performance or emission advantage when the CN is raised past approximately 55; after this point, the fuel's performance hits a plateau. In North America, diesel at the pump can be found in two CN ranges: 40-46 for regular diesel, and 45-50 for premium. Premium diesel may have additives to improve CN and lubricity, detergents to clean the fuel injectors and minimize carbon deposits, water dispersants, and other additives depending on geographical and seasonal needs.

In Europe, diesel cetane numbers were set at a minimum of 49 in 1994 and 51 in 2000.

Dimethyl ether may prove advantageous as a future diesel fuel as it has a high cetane rating (55) and can be produced as a biofuel.

Alkyl nitrates (principally 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate [1]) and di-tert-butyl peroxide are used as additives to raise the cetane number.

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teko

1Z, AHU, AHH = motoare de baza, diesel

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